30 Things to Read and Do to Further Your Anti-Racist Learning

This past week has brought about an immense awakening in our country, and for some, this is the first time they are committing to take action in the endless fight for racial and social justice here in the United States—it’s the first time they’ve begun to understand what #BlackLivesMatter is all about.

For parents, this work is especially important as we attempt to raise the next generation to be better than us. And as we talk to our kids about race, increase the diversity in our toys and books, and work toward changing the social landscape of America for our little ones, we know that first, we need to take on the work of becoming anti-racist for ourselves.

This is not a comprehensive list by any means—it’s a place to start. It’s a place to turn off the noise and tune into the words and perspectives of Black Americans as they take on the heavy emotional burden of letting us into their experiences in this country.

What comes next is action—in the form of community outreach, education, and funding causes that support this work. We can’t just talk about it. We have to act on it. For our Black friends and neighbors who have been shouldering this weight on their own for far too long.

 

Read

 

On Racism in America:

 

1. Don’t Understand the Protests? What You’re Seeing Is People Pushed to the Edge

 

2. Your 5-Year-Old Is Already Racially Biased—Here’s What You Can Do About It

 

3. It Does Not Matter If You Are Good

 

4. Of Course There Are Protests. The State Is Failing Black People

 

5. America’s Racial Contract Is Exposed Anew

 

6. The Death of George Floyd: In Context

 

7. The American Nightmare

 

8. Amy Cooper Knew Exactly What She Was Doing

 

 

On Being Better Allies:

 

9. White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

 

10. For Our White Friends Desiring to Be Allies

 

11. Curriculum for White Americans to Educate Themselves on Race and Racism—From Ferguson to Charleston

 

12. Guide to Allyship

 

13. How White People Can Hold Each Other Accountable to Stop Institutional Racism

 

14. 75 Things White People Can Do for Racial Justice

 

15. How to Talk to Your Family About Racism

 

16. Being Anti-Racist

 

 

On Being a Black Parent in America:

 

17. Raising a Black Son in the US: ‘He Had Never Taken a Breath, and I Was Already Mourning Him’

 

18. Dear White Parents, My Black Son and Husband Need You Right Now

 

19. The Unbearable Grief of Black Mothers

 

20. White Supremacy Takes So Much Already, Don’t Let It Take Your Grief Too

 

21. Becoming a Parent in the Age of Black Lives Matter

 

Act

 

22. 26 Ways to Be in the Struggle

 

23. Raising Race-Conscious Children—Interactive Workshop

 

24. Activism Online Courses by Rachel Ricketts

 

25. Unpacking White Feminism Online Course by Rachel Cargle

 

 

Donate & Support

 

26. Know Your Rights Camp

This organization’s mission is to advance the liberation and well-being of Black and Brown communities through education, self-empowerment, mass-mobilization, and the creation of new systems that elevate the next generation of change leaders.

 

27. National Association of Black Journalists

An organization of journalists, students, and media-related professionals that provides quality programs and services to and advocates on behalf of Black journalists worldwide.

 

28. National Bailout Fund

A donation here allows you to split your money between 40 different community bail funds and racial justice organizers.

 

29. Black Visions Collective

An organization that has been putting into practice the lessons learned from organizations before in order to shape a political home for Black people across Minnesota.

 

30. Campaign Zero

This organization supports the analysis of policing practices across the country, research to identify effective solutions to end police violence, technical assistance to organizers leading police accountability campaigns, and the development of model legislation and advocacy to end police violence nationwide.

 

Read More: Not Sure How to Talk to Your Kids About Race? Here’s How to Start

 

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